Thursday, June 08, 2006

we're moving on up...

...to our own domain name. Yes, as a way to give these vintage patterns a home, I'm packing up and headed to http://www.kitchenerbitch.com. Follow my continued adventures there!

Monday, June 05, 2006

Number Three: Cable V-Neck Cardigan

Here's the next offering in the series. I'm posting these as fast as I can - let me know if there's something in particular you're looking for and I'll try to find it for you!

WOMAN'S LOW V-NECK CARDIGAN Choice of 4 Clever Cable Trims Bernat's Handknit Classics - 1945

Sizing: Bust 34" (36", 38", 40", 42", 44")

This pattern is sized for two separate gauges of yarn- your choice of fingering or DK weight. Fingering Weight: gauge of 7 sts and 10 rows to the inch. The original yarn was Bernat's Boucle de Laine or Fleurette, 150 and 160 yards per ounce respectively. A similar modern yarn would be Koigu KPPM. As a starting point, try size 4 needles. Check needle size to obtain correct gauge. DK Weight - gauge of 6 sts and 9 rows to the inch. The original yarn was Bernat's Knitting Worsted, which was a DK or light worsted yarn at 270 yards per 4 ounces. A similar modern yarn would be RYC Cashsoft DK. As a starting point, try size 6 needles. Check needle size to obtain correct gauge.

A note about sizing - this pattern does not include decreases at the waist, but from the looks of the model it appears to be fit quite snugly. We can only surmise that it therefore fits very tightly, even in light of the fact that it was probably intended to be worn with foundation garments. Add to this the fact that old patterns rarely if ever come with schematics, and you've got some compensation to do. When considering this pattern,debate for yourself whether to go up a size or whether to wear it in its originally intended stomach-sucking glory.

Pattern Stitches for Cable Only:

No. 1: Circle and Spot Cable

Multiple of 12 sts.

Row 1: K2, p2, k4, p2, k2.

Row 2: P2, k2, p4, k2, p2.

Row 3: Same as row 1.

Row 4: Same as row 2.

Row 5: Slip 3 sts onto cable needle and drop to front of work, k2, p1, then p1 and k2 from CN; slip 3 onto cable needle and drop to back of work, K2, p1, then p1 and k2 from CN.

Rows 6-8, 10 and 12: Same as row 2.

Rows 7, 9, and 11: Same as row 1.

Row 13: Slip 3 onto cable needle and drop to back of work, K2, p1, then p1 and k2 from CN, slip 3 sts onto CN and drop to front of work, k2, p1, then p1 and k2 from CN.

Rows 14 and 16: Same as row 2.

Row 15: Same as row 1.

Row 17: K2, P2, K1, slip next 2 sts onto cable needle, wind wool 10 times around these 2 sts, slip these 2 sts back to the right-hand needle, k1, p2, k2.

Row 18: Same as row 2.

Repeat these 18 rows for pattern st.

No. 2: Rib Cable

Multiple of 12 sts.

Rows 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13: K3, p6, k3.

Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14: P3, k6, p3.

Row 15: Slip next 9 sts onto cable needle and drop to back of work, k3, then slip 6 P sts to left hand needle and P these 6 sts, K3 from CN. Row 16: Same as row 2.

Repeat these 16 rows from pattern st.

No. 3: Twisted Cable

Multiple of 12 sts.

Rows 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13: K12.

Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14: P12.

Row 15: Slip 4 sts onto cable needle, drop to vack of work, k4, then bring 4 sts on CN to front of work, k4, then k4 from CN.

Row 16: same as row 2.

Repeat these 16 rows for pattern st.

No. 4. Circle cable.

Multiple of 12 sts.

Rows 1, 3, 5, and 7: K3, p6, k3.

Rows 2, 4, 6, and 8: P3, k6, p3.

Row 9: Slip 3 sts onto cable needle and drop to front of work, p3 then k3 sts from CN, slip next 3 sts onto CN and drop to back of work, k3 sts then p3 from CN.

Rows 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18: K3, p6, k3.

Rows 11, 13, 15, and 17: P3, k6, p3.

Row 19: Slip 3 sts onto cable needle and drop to back of work, k3 then p3 sts from CN, slip next 3 sts onto CN and drop to front of work, p3 sts then k3 from CN.

Row 20: Same as row 2.

Repeat these 20 rows for pattern st.

BACK:

On small needles, cast on 122 (128, 134, 140, 144, 148) sts for lightweight version/ 104 (110, 116, 120, 124, 130) sts for medium-weight version. Work in k1, p1 rib for 4 inches. Change to larger needles and work as follows:

Row 1: P 26 (29, 32, 32, 34, 36) sts / 19 (22, 25, 25, 27, 30) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, p 46 (46, 46, 52, 52, 52) sts/ 42 (42, 42, 46, 46, 46) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, p 26 (29, 32, 32, 34, 36) sts / 19 (22, 25, 25, 27, 30) sts.

Row 2: K 26 (29, 32, 32, 34, 36) sts / 19 (22, 25, 25, 27, 30) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, k 46 (46, 46, 52, 52, 52) sts/ 42 (42, 42, 46, 46, 46) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, k 26 (29, 32, 32, 34, 36) sts / 19 (22, 25, 25, 27, 30) sts.

Continue in this manner, keeping body of cardigan in stockinette st with P side the right side of the work and 2 panel sts in desired pattern st throughout the back. Work even until back measures 12 (12, 12, 13,13, 13) / 12 (12, 12, 13, 13, 13) inches long.

Shape armhole as follows: Bind 7 (7, 7, 8, 8, 8) / 6 (6, 6, 7, 7, 7) sts off at beginning of the next 2 rows (once on each side.) Decrease 1 st at the beginning and end of every other row 7 (7, 8, 8, 8, 8) . 6 (6, 7, 7, 7, 7) times. Work even until armhole measures 7 (7 1/4, 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2, 9)/ 7 (7 1/4, 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2, 9) inches.

Shape shoulders as follows: Bind off 10 (10, 11, 11, 12, 12) / 9 (9, 9, 10, 10, 10) sts at the beginning of the next 6 rows (3 times each side). Bind off remaining sts for back of neck.

LEFT FRONT:

On small needles cast on 66 (69,72, 74, 78, 80) / 52 (55, 58, 60, 66, 69) sts and work in k1, p1 rib for four inches. Change to larger needles and work as follows:

Row 1: P28 (31, 34, 34, 36, 38) / 21 (24, 27, 27, 29, 32) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, p26 (26, 26, 28, 30, 30) / 19, (19, 19, 21, 25, 25) sts.

Row 2: K28 (31, 34, 34, 36, 38) / 21 (24, 27, 27, 29, 32) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, k26 (26, 26, 28, 30, 30) / 19, (19, 19, 21, 25, 25) sts.

Continue to work in same manner as back, keeping body of cardigan in stockinette st and panel sts in pattern st throughout front. Work even for 2 1/s ins, then at inside edge (p edge) 26 (26, 26, 28, 30, 30) / 19 (19, 19, 21, 25, 25) sts. Shape neck as follows: Dec 1 st every 10th row 3 times, then every 8th row 6 times, then every 6th row. In the meantime, when front is the same length as back to armhole at seam edge (opposite end), shape armhole as follows: Bind off 8 (8, 8, 9, 9, 9) / 7 (7, 7, 8, 8, 8) sts then dec 1 st at same edge every other row 8 (8, 9, 9, 9, 9) / 7 (7, 7, 8, 8, 8) times, still continuing to dec 1 st at neck edge until only 30 (30, 33, 33, 36, 36) / 27 (27, 27, 30, 30, 30) sts. Work even until armhole is 1/4 in longer than back.

Shape shoulders as follows: At armside, bind off 10 (10, 11, 11, 12, 12) / 9 (9, 9, 10, 10, 10) sts at the beginning of 3 rows.

RIGHT FRONT:

Work to correspond to left front, be sure to reverse sts so that larger number of P sts is at the end of the needle on the first row.

SLEEVES:

On smaller needles cast on 56 (60, 64, 68, 73, 76) / 52 (56, 60, 64, 68, 72) sts and work in K1, P1 rib for 2 1/2 inches. Change to larger needles and work as follows:

Row 1: P 22 (24, 26, 28, 30, 32) / 20 (22, 24, 26, 28, 30) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, P22 (24, 26, 28, 30, 32) / 20 (22, 24, 26, 28, 30) sts.

Row 2: K 22 (24, 26, 28, 30, 32) / 20 (22, 24, 26, 28, 30) sts, work next 12 sts in pattern st, K 22 (24, 26, 28, 30, 32) / 20 (22, 24, 26, 28, 30) sts.

Continue to work in same manner as back, keeping body sts in stockinette st and panel sts in pattern st, and at the same time inc. 1 st each end of needle every 1/2 inch 5 times, then every 3/4 inch until 90 (94, 96, 98, 104, 106) / 80 (84, 86, 88, 94, 96) sts remain.

Shape sleeve cap as follows: Bind off 6 (6, 6, 7, 7, 7) / 5 (5, 5, 6, 6, 6) sts at the beginning of the next two rows (once each side.) Bind off 4 sts at beginning of next two rows (once each side.) Bind off remaining sts.

BAND: On small needles cast on 11 (11, 11, 11, 11, 11) / 9 (9, 9, 9, 9, 9) sts and work in rib of K1, P1. Work 1/2 inch, then form first buttonhole: k1, p1, k1, bind off 5 (5, 5, 5, 5, 5) / 3 (3, 3, 3, 3, 3) sts, k1, p1, k1. On next row cast on 5 (5, 5, 5, 5, 5) / 3 (3, 3, 3, 3, 3) sts above those bound off.

FINISHING: Join seams. Set in sleeves, easing any excess fullness through shoulder line. Sew on band. Block to size and sew in shoulder pads, if desired for vintage look. Sew on buttons.

Sunday, June 04, 2006

Vintage Patterns part 2 - Pixie Hat

Here's the second in a series of fabulous vintage patterns. Here's a 1946 baby hat pattern that I've adapted - complete with cute little spaceman antenna! I haven't knit this yet, so if you do, please let me know how it works out. This was figured using the excellent database of vintage yarns - kudos to vintageknits.com!

Red Riding Hood Pixie Hat

Sizes: Infant (1 year, 3-4 years.)

Materials - 1 ball sportweight yarn, (2 balls sportweight yarn, l ball worsted weight yarn.)

Sport weight yarn = the original, Bucilla Baby Zephyr 3-fold, had 170 yds/oz. A good substitution would be Dale Baby Ull, with a gauge of approximately 30 stitches to the inch on size 3 needles. (This is a GUESS at intended gauge - none was specified! as soon as I can test this I'll be glad to knit this up and publish the results.)

Worsted weight yarn = the original, Bear Brand Bucilla standard knitting worsted, had 270 yards to 4 oz. This is slightly lighter than most worsted weight yarns (but not all) and slightly heavier than most (but not all) DK weight yarns. A good substitution would be RYC Cashsoft DK, with a gauge of 26 stitches to the inch on size 5 needles. (This is a GUESS at intended gauge - none was specified! as soon as I can test this I'll be glad to knit this up and publish the results.)

Bucilla White Knitting Needles, 1 pr size 3 (4, 5) needles.

Cast on 98 sts. Work in K2, P2 ribbing for 4 rows. Begin pattern stitch: 1st row: K6, p2, *k2, p2;repeat from * to last 6 sts, k6. 2nd row: P6, work ribbing to last 6 sts, p6. 3rd row: Same as row 1. 4th row: K8, work ribbing to last 8 sts, k8. 5th row: P8, work ribbing to last 8 sts, p8. 6th row: Same as row 4. 7th row: K10, work ribbing to last 10 sts, k10. 8th row: P10, work ribbing to last 10 sts, p10. 9th row: Same as row 7. 10th row: K12, work ribbing to last 12 sts, k12. 11th row: P12, work ribbing to last 12 sts, p12. 12th row: Same as row 10. 13th row: K14, work ribbing to last 14 sts, k14. 14th row: P14, work ribbing to last 14 sts, p14. 15th row: Same as row 13. 16th row: K16, work ribbing to last 16 sts, k16. 17th row: P16, work ribbing to last 16 sts, p16. 18th row: Same as row 16. Continue inthis way to work 2 sts more in the crosswise ridgesat beginning and end, and 2 sts less in the vertical ribs in the center, until only the center vertical rib of 2 sts remains. K1 row plain and break off, leaving an 18 in. end for weaving. Place 49 sts on each of the 2 needles, beginning at center and working from right side of last row, weave all sts together. This is center of back.

Neck band - Cast on 10 sts, work ribbing of k1, p1 for 26 (26, 28) inches. Bind off. Block neck band before sewing on, stretching 4 inches in length to a total of 30 (30, 32) inches.

Finishing - Baste 10 (10, 12) center inches of neck band to lower edge of cap and sew on neatly, leaving ends of band free to tie.

Copyright 1944 in USA and Canada, Bernhard Ulmann Co., Inc.

Gentle reader, I'm pleased to share with you a mess of vintage patterns I've recently acquired. Here's the first of what hopefully will be many posted patterns - a lovely 1940s cardigan. Enjoy!

All-Purpose Cardigan from Sweater Classics for Knitters Vol. 16 (1943)
"Just what the name implies! Wear it with anything… anywhere… anytime… it is distinctive… right… decidedly smart!"

Gauge after blocking: 19 sts = 4 inches

Materials: Sizes 6 and 8 needles (OR CORRECT SIZE TO OBTAIN GAUGE - very important!

Yarn: he pattern calls for 5 skeins of Bear Brand or Fleisher's "Special Knitting Worsted", which translates to about 270 yards per 100 g skein. This weight is slightly lighter than most, but not all, modern worsted, and slightly heavier than most, but not all, modern DK. Yarns that approach 270 yards/100g include: - Filatura di Crosa 501 - Jaeger Extra Fine Merino DK - Knit Picks Merino Style - RYC Cashsoft DK Measurements - Bust - 34" (36", 38") Keep in mind that (a) sweaters were designed to hug the body and (b) people wore girdles and all sorts of other support garments, so these account for a smaller waist than might otherwise be the case in modern-day sizing. Back: With size 6 needles, cast on 73 (77, 81) sts. Work in K1, P1 ribbing for 8" (8 1/4", 8 1/2"). Change to size 8 needles and begin pattern stitch: Row 1: P1, *k1, p1; repeat from * to end. Row 2: K1, *p1, k1; repeat from * to end. Repeat these two rows of ribbing for 4 inches, ending with row 2.

Bind off 4 sts at beginning of each of next 2 rows for underarm. Dec 1 st ea side every 2nd row 4 times, taking care to keep pattern st = 57 (61, 65) sts. Work even until piece measures 12" (13 3/4", 15 3/4".)

Bind off 2 (4, 6) sts at beginning of each of next 2 rows. Bind off 4 sts at beginning of next 8 rows. Bind off remaining 21 sts.

Right Front: With size 6 needles, cast on 41 (45, 49) sts. Work same as back up to armhole for 8" (8 1/4", 8 1/2"), ending with 2nd pattern row at underarm edge. Bind off 6 sts at beginning of next row for underarm. Dec 1 st at armhole edge every 2nd row 6 times - 29 (33, 37) sts. Work even until piece measures 13 1/4" (13 3/4", 14 1/4".) Bind off 4 (6, 8) sts at beginning of next row for neck. Dec 1 st at neck edge every 2nd row 7 times, shaping shoulder as on back when armhole is same length as back armhole.

Left Front: Work as right front up to underarm, ending with first pattern row on underarm edge. Finish to correspond to right front, shaping armhole, neck and shoulder at opposite sides.

Sleeves: With size 6 needles, cast on 37 sts for cuff. Work ribbing for 2 inches, ending with 2nd row. Change to size 8 needles. Working pattern, inc 1 st each side every 1 1/4" (1", 1") 10 (12, 14) times = 57 (61, 65) sts. Work even until cuff measures 14 3/4" (15", 15".) Bind off 5 sts at beginning of each of next 2 rows for underarm. Dec 1 st at each side every 2nd row 7 times - 33 (37, 41) sts. Work even until total sleeve measures 18 1/4" (18 3/4", 19".) Dec 1 st at each side of next row, then dec 1 st at each side every 2nd row twice. Bind off 2 sts at beginning of next 4 rows; then 3 sts at beginning of next 2 rows = 13 (17, 21) sts. Bind remaining sts off.

Finishing: Sew seams. Sew in sleeves with sleeve seam at center underarm and extra fullness held in across top of armhole.

Buttonhole band: Join yarn at lower corner of right front edge. Work 69 (70, 71) sc on front edge, 1 sc at corner, continue sc around neck edge, holding in to desired size, working around and down left front edge to correspond. Second row - working back, ch1, turn, working in front loop only' 1 sc in each of 70 (71, 72) sts on left front edge. Repeat 2nd row twice. Fasten off. Join yarn at right corner of neck. Work 2nd row on right front as on left side. 3rd row - ch 1, turn, working in front loop only; 1 sc in each of first 2 (3, 4) sts. *Ch 2 for buttonhole, skip next 2 sts, 1 sc in each of next 11 sts; repeat from * 5 times, end last repeat 1 sc in last st. 4th row - same as 2nd row. 5th row - Ch 1, turn, working in front loop only; 1 sc in each st on right front, neck edge, and left front, working 2 sc at cornersl 4 sc on lower edge of left front band. Fasten off. Work 4 sc on lower edge of right front band to correspond.

Steam lightly & sew on 6 buttons. For most authentic 40s look, use light shoulder pads.

Wednesday, May 31, 2006

amazing lace resource

I don't know exactly when this happened, but this is a lovely resource on lace knitting - the relics of a symposium that took place earlier this month. I especially like the deconstruction of lace patterns. Enjoy!

Friday, May 26, 2006

Knit Goddess worship

Have you gone on over to Eunny Jang's excellent blog recently? Ms. Jang has topped her own amazing lace tutorial (which topped her amazing steek tutorial) by commencing to write a regular advice column for sticky knitting issues. That's right, the reigning knit-mistress of many a difficult technical issue will now answer your toughest questions, pretty much daily. How sweet is that people?

Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Mmmmm, artyarns.

Here's the latest WIP - in Artyarns Silk Rhapsody, which is sooooo appealing: More to come!

Wednesday, May 10, 2006

Charm City part two - yarn, yarn and more yarn:

I came back from Baltimore with serious booty, people, booty of the pirate variety (that is, if pirates could knit.) Here's a sampling of the tastiness I picked up in Maryland: First, the luscious roving in the bottom of the pic. The natural is Corriedale curls; the brilliant orange is blue-faced Leicester and Cotswold. It's ridiculous - I can't spin, and I bought only a tiny amount of each - but I was so drawn to these that I decided I would determinedly figure out how to make a shawl or two with great curly locks as fringe. The grey is some wonderfully lustrous Mountain Shepherdess yarn from Coburn Creek Farm & Pottery in West Virginia. And the blue mohair was a thrift store score at 50 cents a ball! Best of all, in the center, is this extraordinary 100% kid mohair fingering weight from Brooks Farm. I didn't realize until it was too late that this might be a yarn worth stocking up on. It's extraordinary stuff, all of it, and much more is available at the shows than is available on their website. In other yarn acquisitions, I've made some nice trades lately - including this gorgeous Koigu: There's more of that (in a crazy bright color) that you'll be seeing when I show off my half completed sock! And here's some lovely Noro, which I am going to make into a mitered bag: Thank goodness for Knitty!

Tuesday, May 09, 2006

Greetings from Charm City, part one - the fun

...Baltimore! Yes, fabulous, genteel, skeezy Baltimore, home of Edgar Allen Poe and Divine and the fried soft shell crab sandwich. I spent a wonderful weekend in Charm City with four of my oldest and closest friends. It was a blast - and here's the evidence of a late-night toast to our arrival by the world's most fantastic host, LaddieO: Yes, Maria, Aushra, Laddie and I all make those faces when someone points a camera at us. Baltimore is indeed Charm City, but its charms are somewhat dilapidated and blowsy - like a somewhat plain but decidedly vivacious floozy. It's no wonder that this is the home of John Waters. Everywhere we went, it felt as if we were in the center of Polyester - the little row houses, the sense of vague criminality, the cuteness and horror of it all. We stayed in Pigtown, where we encountered both wonderful things (grafitti that declared "Fat Chicks Rock", lovingly restored townhouses) and, late at night, the sound of semi-automatic gunfire in the darkness. We had only a sampling of what Baltimore has to offer, but what we did catch was great. Nothing quite made our day like catching the Baltimore Kinetic Sculpture Race - which we were lucky enough to do last Saturday. Sponsored by the amazing American Visionary Art Museum - one of the finest museums I have ever had the pleasure to visit - the race pits amphibious, man-powered vehicles against each other on a course that includes an obstacle course, a water segment in the harbor, and several damn steep hills. Here are a few pics of our own: After the race, we headed on down to the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival. All I can say is that it was paradise for yarn freaks and knittyheads. Imagine, if you will, a state fair type environs but devoted entirely to yarn and the beasties it comes from: It came as a bit of a shock to all of us that such a thing even existed. (I suppose none of us quite knew what to expect when we went.) But Maria caught yarn fever and started knitting over the weekend. One of us! One of us! - ahem. Another convert to my dearest addiction. It lends a new understanding to my fiber-lust, knowing where the yarn ultimately comes from, being close to the animals and even to bags and bags of fleece (witness Maria, above, encountering roving for the first time.) Here's Maria and Aushra, taking turns holding a wee baby lamb: They are so outrageously cute that they make you want to run home and put sheep in the backyard. We wouldn't have to mow the lawn then, would we now? The next day, after what seemed like several thousand pounds of food (including remarkably fresh sushi, several ill-fated live crabs, and the most amazing grits with marscapone and bacon at a place named Miss Shirley's), we headed over to our friend Michelle's art exhibit at the Garrett family manse. Michelle's piece was really fantastic - incorporating a set of rubber bulbs, bird call reeds, and gramophone horns into a pair of gorgeous wallpapered duck blinds. Here's Laddie and Amy enjoying the quack of it all: Here's a lovely pic of the bunch of us in front of Michelle's piece: Tomorrow: on to the good stuff - yarn porn a g0-g0!

Friday, April 21, 2006

kestrels

The kestrels are back in our neighborhood again. Last year they nested on our roof - a location which, given that we live in the inner city, is not as likely as you might think. Every morning at about 6 AM, we awoke to the sight and sounds of two beautiful hawks. ( Usually the sight and sound of them dismembering a squirrel. If you haven't seen a raptor tear at its prey before you've had your morning coffee, you've missed a treat.) Despite the scary morning show, we loved the urban Wild Kingdom aspects of sharing the yard with these gorgeous creatures. The swooping, the cawing (the unmistakeable hawk-like cawing), the refreshing absence of squirrels in the garden - we loved every minute of it. They only stayed for a little while, but now they're back, two trees over, just a little ways down the street. Their cries still wake me up - just no carnage-o-vision. I'm so pleased that something very wild can live in this place, shaking up the usual mix of rats and pigeons and squirrels. I'll try to post pictures if I can capture the speedy little buggers. In other fauna sightings, the other day Mr. Man and I saw a giant crow eating a rat in the middle of the road. Is that a bad omen or what?

Monday, April 10, 2006

Finished Object: Ella

I finally finished it! It took me two weeks to block it, only because I didn't want to stop wearing long enough to block it: Pattern: Ella (from Knitty) Yarn: Lorna's Laces Lion & Lamb in Gold Hill Needles: size 10.5 circular, 29" Yardage: Approximately 630 yards (3 1/4 skeins) Gauge: 4.5 sts/inch Modifications: used a worsted weight instead of DK weight yarn It's a bit of a blanket, but I'm proud of it all the same. The pattern is just beautiful... I love it so and it is soft soft soft!

Saturday, April 01, 2006

Sex and yarn and rock and roll

It's time for Flash Your Stash 2006! Before we go straight to the good stuff, a special announcement: CLICK ON EACH PHOTO FOR A JUMBO SCREEN-SAVER SIZED PIC! The detail is MUCH better in the biggies than in the thumbnails. So enjoy. Now, without further ado, uncensored, for your viewing pleasure, LIVE! NUDE! YARN!!! First, the newest addition to my stash, and way up there on the Sexy-O-Meter - a mess of Manos. I just got nine skeins in the Bramble colorway. Ready and waiting for be turned into hot hot yarncake! And now for some exotic goodies from far-off Los Angeles - delicious, nutritious Suss Cotton Twisted. This stuff is so obscure that it's not even on Suss's website - but is it hot hot hot! Dig the mossy green and pool blue strands twisted together - and check out that thick-on-thin action people! More Suss - technically not in my stash, but visiting while I swatch it for the store - gorgeous Coolaid and crazy-wacky-hairy Twist. So colorful, it's YARN GONE WILD!: Here's a gorgeous strawberry treat, in the form of Farmhouse Yarns' Summer Silk Spun Cotton. It doesn't get any yarnier than this! It's a cotton/silk blend (as I suppose the name implies) that's soft as butter and a pleasure to work with. If you look very very closely, you'll see little tweedy flecks of all sorts of colors in there: And another recent addition to the stash is this mouth-watering Lorna's Laces Shepherd Sock in Aslan. I'm keeping it apart from the rest of the sock yarn because it's going to make me the loveliest shawl of all time. Aren't those color changes something luscious? They're ready and waiting to make HOT SOCKS! Now here is some primo Fleece Artist shit, people, you have to go to Canada to get your hands on these babies. Fleece Artist, as far as I can tell, is King of Boucle - The real delicious treat is Kiss Curls, a lovely gift from my spectacular SP, Jamie Kate (I love you dahlink!) 86% kid and 14% nylon, with 250 g = 1000 meters. Talk about macro photography - it's thinner than a line in my fingerprint!: This stuff is incredibly thin, but with the most wonderful mohair loop texture - perfect for a rustic shawl. I have 2200 meters in each of two colors: the elegant semi-solid "Ebony" - check out that thin thin strand. So lovely and touchable! Splendid, splendid stuff made by nice people. Run out and buy some (but leave a few hanks for me, okay?) And here's a fine example in their Dreadlocks yarn, the bulky grandaddy of big loops: Here's some Curlylocks, a DK weight mohair/wool/nylon blend that knits like a dream: And then there's more Kiss Curls in the sexy "Mermaid" colorway-dig that funky variegation! - Since we're already into some laceweight, let's go for the goods. First, some photos that have been featured here before (but I couldn't leave them out of the stash!) Here's some lovely lace weight wool (again from my fabulous SP!) from handpaintedyarn.com - 1400 yards total: Here's a mess of laceweight cashmere, salvaged from an old Dalton sweater with mothholes and Kool-Aid dyed: And here's a gorgeous bounty of turquoise Knit Picks Alpaca Cloud, picked out by my SP expressly for the Peacock Shawl: My SP also sent me this beautiful Misti Alpaca laceweight, in a great heathered green and a camel. Good yardage, too! Just dig that hot hot yarn up close and personal. Can you tell I got spoiled or what? Now that we've gotten through the lacy stuff, here's some delicious sock yarn. Here I present to you some hot cat-on-yarn action! Yes, that's right - Live Nude Cats (namely, Floyd) attacking my Regia: And here is Floyd attacking a beautiful self-striping sock yarn, I believe a Schachenmayer print: Then there's this lovely Patons sock yarn (again from the super-SP!), destined to become some kind of fair isle fun: Onward and upward - going further through the stash, my delicious bamboo yarn is soft as silk: Lovely Rowan All Seasons Cotton, ready and waiting to turn into Lucky someday: The delicious yarn CashSoft, in more candy pink - worthy of skivvies (although destined to be a hat): Here's a pile of silky-soft angora from my friend Laura, waiting to be a soft and willing knitted thing: And here's a lovely selection of bits of mohair I have eventual plans for - a stripey scarf? A crazy hat? It's an orgy of colors in the fiber that dare not speak its name! This is some lovely pink brushed alpaca from Plymouth, that's suffered some heavy petting: Alpaca and silk make an Oriental delight! Indiecita Alpaca Boucle - with nubs for your pleasure! It's a lotta alpaca - all soft and fabulous: Then just look at this sweet and innocent Barely Legal Pima Cotton: Wild and crazy candy colors just waiting for your needles of love! Henry's Attic is wonderful stuff. Isn't he a stud? And what's kinkier than a twist? And what would a stash be without trusty Cascade? Pure, uncut 220 - And sexy-licious STRETCH Fixation - perfect for naughty stockings! High class stuff - my leftover Lorna's Lace: And last but not least - a whole mess of Peer Gynt for funkilicious felting: That's all for our peep show! Sex and yarn and rock and roll, people. Peace out.